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WWDC: Get to know Apple’s 11+ new privacy tools

2 months 2 weeks ago

Apple introduced an array of additional privacy protections at WWDC 2019. Many of these both offer protection and help us better understand how our privacy is undermined.

Why does this matter?

Apple CEO Tim Cook is passionate about the need to protect user privacy, and this is by no means a one-man mission.

Speaking with Vector, Apple’s vice president of software technology, Bud Tribble, stressed the need to educate people into the needs and benefits of privacy, a topic he believes is much more widely discussed now than before.

To read this article in full, please click here

Jonny Evans

WWDC: Get to know Apple’s 11+ new privacy tools

2 months 2 weeks ago

Apple introduced an array of additional privacy protections at WWDC 2019. Many of these both offer protection and help us better understand how our privacy is undermined.

Why does this matter?

Apple CEO Tim Cook is passionate about the need to protect user privacy and this is by no means a one man mission.

Speaking with Vector, Apple’s VP Software Technology, Bud Tribble stressed the need to educate people into the needs and benefits of privacy, a topic he believes is much more” widely discussed now than before.

To read this article in full, please click here

Jonny Evans

Mozilla makes anti-tracking the Firefox default

2 months 2 weeks ago

Mozilla this week began to switch on an aggressive anti-tracking technology in Firefox that it has touted since 2015.

With a June 4 update to Firefox 67, Mozilla turned on Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) by default for new users. Existing customers simply updating their browsers may enable ETP themselves. The default-of-on will be extended to those users "in the coming months," Mozilla said, apparently activating it in stages as a last-step quality control.

[ Related: What's in the latest Firefox update? ]

Mozilla also used the update to Firefox 67.0.1 to trumpet other privacy- and security-centric enhancements, including an add-on that brings its Lockwise password manager to the desktop browser and an improved Facebook Container, an extension designed to keep the social network behemoth from tracking users elsewhere on the web.

To read this article in full, please click here

Gregg Keizer

NSA, Microsoft implore enterprises to patch Windows' 'BlueKeep' flaw before it's too late

2 months 2 weeks ago

The U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) on Tuesday called on IT administrators to apply security updates issued by Microsoft three weeks ago, adding to a chorus of voices urging haste.

"The National Security Agency is urging Microsoft Windows administrators and users to ensure they are using a patched and updated system in the face of growing threats," the NSA said in a June 4 advisory.

[ Related: Microsoft Windows 10 vs. Apple macOS: 18 security features compared ]

The agency's advice followed by several days that of Microsoft itself. On Thursday, May 30, a company official reminded users of the updates - which the company released May 14 - and implied that time is short. "We strongly advise that all affected systems should be updated as soon as possible," Simon Pope, the director of incident response at the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC), wrote in a blog post.

To read this article in full, please click here

Gregg Keizer

WWDC: What you need to know about Sign In with Apple

2 months 2 weeks ago

There’s lots of interest in Apple’s new Sign In with Apple system, a highly secure, private way to sign in to apps and websites. Here’s what you need to know:

What is Sign In with Apple?

Apple has noticed that sign-in systems for services, apps, and websites rely on services that use your action of signing in to place cookies on your computer and track what you do.

Apple’s focus on privacy means it is attempting to restrict such practices, which is why it has developed the new system as a more private way to sign into these apps and services.

To read this article in full, please click here

Jonny Evans

It’s time to install the May Windows and Office patches

2 months 2 weeks ago

May 2019 will go down in the annals of Patch-dom as the month we all ran for cover to fend off another WannaCry-caliber worm, but a convincing exploit never emerged.

Microsoft officially released Windows 10 version 1903 on May 21, but I haven’t yet heard from anyone who’s been pushed. All of the complaints I hear are from those “seekers” who went to the download site and installed 1903 with malice and forethought. A triumph of hope over experience.

This month, if you let Windows Update have its way on your machine, you may end up with a different build number than the person sitting next to you. Blame the gov.uk debacle for that: Folks with Windows set up for U.K. English get an extra cumulative update pushed onto their machines, whilst those who don’t fly the Union Jack will get the fix in due course next month.

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Woody Leonhard

Who watches the iOS parental control apps?

2 months 3 weeks ago

Children are emotional. Protecting them matters. When it comes to technology, do you want developers you don’t know over whom you have no control watching what your children do on their devices?

Apple doesn't

Apple recently cut developers off from using MDM software to drive third-party parental control solutions.

Developers were upset, and seventeen smaller developers you’ve probably never heard of got together just days before Apple’s WWDC 2019 conference with a well-organized PR campaign and a professional website to demand access to new API’s that let them develop parental control software for iOS.

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Jonny Evans

Microsoft Patch Alert: Patching whack-a-mole continues

2 months 3 weeks ago

In a normal month, you need a scorecard to keep track of Windows patches. Now, your scorecards need a scorecard. One ray of hope: It looks like some Windows 10 cumulative updates will include the new “Download and install now” feature.

The May 2019 Windows updates have taken so many twists and turns it’s hard to pin things down, but as of Thursday morning, here’s what we’ve seen.

Windows 10 cumulative updates

As of now, all of the recent versions of Win10 (1607/Server 2016, 1703, 1709, 1803, 1809/Server 2019) have had three cumulative updates in May. Depending on where you live (or, more correctly, which locality you’ve chosen for your machine), you’ve been pushed one or two of them. If you’re a “seeker” (and clicked “Check for updates” or downloaded and installed the patches), you’ve had at least two, and maybe three. Got that?

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Woody Leonhard

AT&T becomes first big mobile carrier to accept Bitcoin payments

2 months 4 weeks ago

AT&T will allow customers to pay their mobile bills using Bitcoin, adding its name to a short list of major businesses and government agencies that allow the blockchain-based cryptocurrency to be used as a form of payment.

While not directly accepting cryptocurrency, AT&T is the first major U.S. mobile carrier to let customers pay in Bitcoin through a third-party service provider.

Customers using its online bill pay service or the myAT&T app will be able to choose BitPay, a cryptocurrency payment processor for payments. The customer pays in Bitcoin and BitPay verifies the funds and accepts the Bitcoin on behalf of the business.

To read this article in full, please click here

Lucas Mearian

Microsoft sets post-retirement patching record with Windows XP fix – 5 years after support ended

3 months ago

Microsoft on Wednesday resurrected Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 long enough to push patches to the long-dead products. It was the first time since 2017 that Microsoft deemed the situation serious enough to warrant a security fix for XP.

Windows XP fell off the public support list in April 2014, while Windows Server 2003 was removed in July 2015.

[ Related: Windows 7 to Windows 10 migration guide ]

"If you are on an out-of-support version, the best way to address this vulnerability is to upgrade to the latest version of Windows," Simon Pope, director of incident response at the Microsoft Security Response Center, asserted in a post to a company blog. "Even so, we are making fixes available for these out-of-support versions of Windows."

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Gregg Keizer

Do Apple devices need anti-virus software?

3 months ago

Apple’s devices are far better defended against malware and viruses than other platforms, but does that mean they don’t need anti-virus software?

No, yes, and maybe

I’ve lost track of the number of times Mac users have told me Macs don’t need virus protection because the machines are inherently more robust against such attacks.

I’ve also lost count of how many security researchers have said that Apple devices are becoming more liable to being attacked as their market share grows.

Both are right. Both are wrong.

To read this article in full, please click here

Jonny Evans

WhatsApp attacked by spyware | TECH(feed)

3 months ago
WhatsApp’s recent spyware hack took advantage of a security vulnerability and allowed attackers to access private, digital communication. In this episode of TECH(feed), Juliet walks through the hack, who was affected and how you can secure your devices ASAP.

If you’re running Windows XP, 7 or associated Servers, patch them

3 months ago

As of very early Wednesday morning, I don’t hear any loud screams of pain from the May Patch Tuesday bumper crop of patches. There’s still much we don’t know about the “WannaCry-like” security hole in pre-Win8 versions of Windows — more about that in a moment — but all indications at this point lead me to believe that it’s smarter to patch now and figure out how to fix any damage later.

The cause is a bug in Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Services that can allow an attacker to take over your earlier-generation Windows PC if it’s connected to the internet. Not all machines are vulnerable. But the number of exposed machines — the size of the honey jar — makes it likely that somebody will come up with a worm shortly.

To read this article in full, please click here

Woody Leonhard

The iPhone user's guide to the WhatsApp hack attack

3 months 1 week ago

Hackers have used a security bug inside WhatsApp to install spyware through an infected WhatsApp voice call, and Apple users are affected.

What WhatsApp users need to do

If you are one of the 1.5 billion people who use WhatsApp, you should immediately update both your app and your iOS software to the latest version.

The app update includes fixes that should prevent hackers from taking over your iPhone, while future Apple updates will also likely address these flaws.

[ Related: Apple is learning why shortcut security is a bad idea ] What is the threat?

Israeli hackers from a company called the NSO Group developed the spyware specifically so they could get into people’s devices.

To read this article in full, please click here

Jonny Evans

Why Microsoft is building a Bitcoin-based ID verification system

3 months 1 week ago

After more than a year in development, Microsoft has chosen Bitcoin as the blockchain platform for a decentralized identification (DID) verification system that will allow users to have secure access to an online persona via an encrypted database hub.

The implications of the new ID network could include the elimination of passwords. A company would be able to verify the background of a new employee and onboard them with the click of a single virtual button, or a banking customer could verify their identity for a loan without exposing personally identifiable information – again with a click of a button.

To read this article in full, please click here

Lucas Mearian

Business laptop? $1,000. Sending away the thief? Priceless.

3 months 1 week ago

The time is 2001, not long after 9/11, and the place is New York City. Heightened security awareness is the order of the day, and everyone in pilot fish’s office is required to carry an access card that activates the office doors. Look out for tailgaters, they’re all told. Those are people dressed like professionals who slide in behind someone with an access card and then steal wallets, coats and more.

One morning, fish arrives at the office and passes a man in business-casual attire carrying a laptop tucked under his arm and headed for the elevators. Fish doesn’t recognize the fellow, but he does know the co-worker who is running behind him, calling for someone to call building security and the police. The co-worker had returned to an empty desk just seconds after this tailgater had snatched his laptop, well before the tailgater could make a clean getaway.

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Sharky

No, Google, Apple's privacy is not a luxury item

3 months 1 week ago

Why is privacy a luxury? Possibly because surveillance capitalist firms have subsidized product prices by collecting and trading in the personal data of the people that use their products, enabling them to sell hardware cheap.

The consequences of convenience

The crux of Google CEO Sundar Pichai’s argument against firms such as (obviously including but never named) Apple is that his company offers convenience in exchange for personal secrets, makes its services available for free, and has a “profound commitment” to protecting user privacy.

To read this article in full, please click here

Jonny Evans

The SAP/Apple partnership changes everything

3 months 2 weeks ago

SAP and Apple are working together to help businesses build applications that use Apple’s machine learning and augmented reality (AR) technologies.

Apple is the enterprise

Apple CEO Tim Cook joined SAP CEO Bill McDermott at the latter company’s SAPPHIRE conference to announce the news.

“A man who is the last to accept the status quo, and the first to change it,” said McDermott introducing Cook.

[ Related: AR in the enterprise: Tips for a better augmented reality app ]

Since entering into a business app development partnership with Apple in 2016, SAP has become an increasingly Apple-based business with around 100,000 Apple devices in use across the company.

To read this article in full, please click here

Jonny Evans
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About SecurityFeeds

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Tim Weil is a Security Architect/IT Security Manager with over twenty five years of IT management, consulting and engineering experience in the U.S. Government and Communications Industry.  Mr. Weil's technical areas of expertise include IT Security Management, Enterprise Security Architecture, FISMA Compliance, Identity Management, and Network Engineering. Mr. Weil is a Senior Member of the IEEE and has served in several IEEE positions.